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Archive for May, 2009

The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same:
By Rennis Buchner
Copyright © Rennis Buchner, 2009. Not to be used without permission

Most of us are well aware for the old “-do/-jutsu”, “spiritual/combative” argument by now and how most people in Japan do not follow the clear cut distinctions between the two that have seemingly been so clearly defined in the West. The argument seems to have initially gained steam in judo circles, and then spread to other gendai-budo quickly. The argument usually (more…)

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Pieces of the Puzzle:
By Rennis Buchner
Copyright © Rennis Buchner, 2009. Not to be used without permission

When researching a ryu in depth, one is often confronted with more seemingly unsolvable puzzles than straight forward facts. The loss of records, coupled with fragile hand written documents, oral traditions, the occasional bit of historical revisionism and just the sheer passage of time make it certain that after several years of hard work you will probably have many more questions than answers. In many cases this really does not matter. In most ryuha, the tradition handed down with in the ryu, (more…)

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Right To Be Wrong?

Right To Be Wrong?

By Rennis Buchner
Copyright © Rennis Buchner, 2009. Not to be used without permission

The long term process of training in a traditional martial art is filled with endless opportunities for valuable rewards and frustrating failures. Students must overcome physical and psychologic problems to push themselves to higher and higher levels of progress. Sometimes progress can be quick and provide oneself with the satisfaction that one is indeed making progress. Other times, one can feel like the proverbial wheels have just been spinning for ages and no progress has been made for far too long. For beginners, and I use the term as my own sensei uses it including students well into the dan ranking system, the process is taxing as one must endlessly grapple with getting (more…)

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“Muso Madness”: A look at some of the debate surrounding koryu and modern iai through two of the art’s most popular ryuha.

By Rennis Buchner
Copyright © Rennis Buchner, 2009. Not to be used without permission

By this point it is probably beyond argument that Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu and Muso Shinden-ryu are the overwhelming most practiced koryu iai ryuha both in Japan (with Eishin-ryu being the choice of Western Japan and Shinden-ryu being the choice of the Eastern half of the country) and (more…)

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I wrote this piece earlier this year for kenshi247.net, which is a good site for those into kendo and sword arts in general. CLICK HERE to check it out.

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A Look at Hoki ryu Iai (Revised)

By Rennis Buchner
Copyright © Rennis Buchner, 2000 (revised 2009). Not to be used without permission

Before I begin, I would like to make a short disclaimer. While I have spent a great deal of time in working on the research from which this article is based, what I have written should not be taken as the “final word” on Hoki ryu. As my reseach continues, new information regularly comes to light, sometimes greatly changing my previous views of the art. For those reasons, this should be viewed just as a general “rough” overview of (more…)

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The Long Expected Return?

Well it has been probably 5 years or more since I took down the old Acme Bugei website. While there was some interesting stuff there, at the point I was at then I felt there really wasn’t much else for me to contribute at the time and I needed to focus on my training for a while. To be honest I still feel that way for the most part, but my sensei has been pushing for me to start writing again and I have had some ideas for things to write about floating around in my head lately so I suppose it is time to give the ole’ web thing another shot.

As with the original site, there will be a mix of budo related stuff, together with some stuff for family and friends back home. Blogging seems to fit the commentary nature of the original site better than a full on web page so we’ll see how this goes.

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